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  • Re: Organic farming and efforts to save indigenous species!

    by » 2 years ago


    Generally indigenous varities are not capable of productivity to meet the ever increasing needs of expanding population. It is therefore imperative to introduce hybrid seeds. Yes dilution in taste may occur but that difference is felt by persons who consume both.


    Thank you said by: Kalyani Nandurkar

  • Re: Organic farming and efforts to save indigenous species!

    by » 2 years ago


    Hybrid varieties definitely are tasteless and local varieties are any day better even though they are more expensive. Here locally grown bindi which is long and light green in color and Gulla , a variety of brinjal not grown anywhere else , also certain greens are sought after and people pay any price asked since the quantity grown has come down drastically . 


    Pay no mind to those who talk behind your back, it simply means that you are two steps ahead !!!


  • Re: Organic farming and efforts to save indigenous species!

    by » 2 years ago


    usha manohar wrote:

    Hybrid varieties definitely are tasteless and local varieties are any day better even though they are more expensive. Here locally grown bindi which is long and light green in color and Gulla , a variety of brinjal not grown anywhere else , also certain greens are sought after and people pay any price asked since the quantity grown has come down drastically . 

    Here too local varieties of fruits and vegetables are normally cultivated in traditional method without depending on chemicals and other fertilizer. Such organically grown varieties are high in demand as they they are tastier, healthier and also can be preserved for longer duration. Chemically treated vegetables tend to decay faster. So the price of these local varieties increases, sometimes almost double those of hybrid or chemically grown varieties


  • Re: Organic farming and efforts to save indigenous species!

    by » 2 years ago


    Normally there is no difference in nutrient values in organic and other types of vegetables etc. It is only if overdose of chemicals is given then problems arise.


  • Re: Organic farming and efforts to save indigenous species!

    by » 2 years ago


    jabeen wrote:
    usha manohar wrote:

    Hybrid varieties definitely are tasteless and local varieties are any day better even though they are more expensive. Here locally grown bindi which is long and light green in color and Gulla , a variety of brinjal not grown anywhere else , also certain greens are sought after and people pay any price asked since the quantity grown has come down drastically . 

    Here too local varieties of fruits and vegetables are normally cultivated in traditional method without depending on chemicals and other fertilizer. Such organically grown varieties are high in demand as they they are tastier, healthier and also can be preserved for longer duration. Chemically treated vegetables tend to decay faster. So the price of these local varieties increases, sometimes almost double those of hybrid or chemically grown varieties

    Sadly even that may not last long with farming , cultivation and Fields giving way to urbanisation  , there is no scope for making organic manure since it requires cow dung , dried up bark and leaves of the trees and other disposable vegetable material..


    Pay no mind to those who talk behind your back, it simply means that you are two steps ahead !!!


  • Re: Organic farming and efforts to save indigenous species!

    by » 2 years ago


    Now a days, organic forming is the term which is trending. It is good to go for organic farming wherever it is possible so that we can produce healthy human being society. I want to know what are the differences between natural farming and organic farming?. If anyone is having views on this, please share.


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