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The central goverment has partly reveald the hidden agenda by issuing directive to state govrnments to observe 'Sanskrit week';. Sanskrit is ancient Indian language with rich literature. The original Hindu scriptures are in Sanskrit.
However, Sanskrit is not living language. There appears no legitimate reason for celebrating Sanskrit week, Tamilnadu C.M has highlightd the rich tradition of south and the Tamil language, which is also very ancient with rich literature. She has suggested that instead of sanskrit week, the states could be directed to observe cultural week in accordance with thir own regional culture/ traditions.

http://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/jayalalithaa-opposes-celebration-of-sanskrit-week-114071900267_1.html

G. K. Ajmani Tax consultant
http://gkajmani-mystraythoughts.blogspot.com/

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  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!

    "I am free of all prejudice. I hate everyone equally."
    - W. C. Fields :)


  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    While foreigners are searching through ancient Sanskrit books for new inventions in all fields we find the most sacred language of the world 'dead'. It will soon be dead if we do not try to revive it and take full advantage of treasure hidden in it.

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  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    We the Indians should be thankful to the central government for launching such activities which are the mainstay of our own culture and lost in to the time because of our own negligence and craze for the foreign cultures and languages. Kudos to the wise decision of the Government.

  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!


    Not only Sanskrit but some othr languages like Greek, Latin and Hebrew are also dead. A language no more use is called dead language. This means no insult. Nobody says that an ancient language nomore living is not taught. But this is more relevant to scholars and not general public. For whom is Sanskrit week intended? If this is for scholars, Indian astrologers, purohits, pandas- well. .

    G. K. Ajmani Tax consultant
    http://gkajmani-mystraythoughts.blogspot.com/


  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!


    Not only Sanskrit but some othr languages like Greek, Latin and Hebrew are also dead. A language no more use is called dead language. This means no insult. Nobody says that an ancient language nomore living is not taught. But this is more relevant to scholars and not general public. For whom is Sanskrit week intended? If this is for scholars, Indian astrologers, purohits, pandas- well. .


    The purpose of observing Sanskrit week is to remind the people about the greatness of an ancient language around which the whole Indian culture revolved, even though it's no more in Use. Are we not observing the weeks to remember those great people and their contribution to the country even after their death?

  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!


    Not only Sanskrit but some othr languages like Greek, Latin and Hebrew are also dead. A language no more use is called dead language. This means no insult. Nobody says that an ancient language nomore living is not taught. But this is more relevant to scholars and not general public. For whom is Sanskrit week intended? If this is for scholars, Indian astrologers, purohits, pandas- well. .


    The purpose of observing Sanskrit week is to remind the people about the greatness of an ancient language around which the whole Indian culture revolved, even though it's no more in Use. Are we not observing the weeks to remember those great people and their contribution to the country even after their death?


    People already know the greatness of Sanskrit especially when they undergo cermonies like marriage, death, house inauguration and so on. There is definitely some hidden agenda behind such sudden mega activity. It appears strange why some are unhappy with characterization of language as 'dead'. 'Dead' does not mea that this is not rich in literature or some areas of knowledge. Similarly, there are some other dead languages like Latin, Hebrew, Greek. This is despite the fact that Latin language contains origin of modern law.

    G. K. Ajmani Tax consultant
    http://gkajmani-mystraythoughts.blogspot.com/


  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    I believe it is a very good initiative to observe Sanskrit Week. It will not only highlight the importance of this language, it will help revive it too. Moreover, Sanskrit is still part of curriculum in certain schools. So not sure if its correct to say that it is a dead language. Moreover, all vernacular languages in India have been derived from Sanskrit and are still in use. So it is still alive and will remain so.

    “A mistake is a crash-course in learning” – Billy Anderson


  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!


    Not only Sanskrit but some othr languages like Greek, Latin and Hebrew are also dead. A language no more use is called dead language. This means no insult. Nobody says that an ancient language nomore living is not taught. But this is more relevant to scholars and not general public. For whom is Sanskrit week intended? If this is for scholars, Indian astrologers, purohits, pandas- well. .


    The purpose of observing Sanskrit week is to remind the people about the greatness of an ancient language around which the whole Indian culture revolved, even though it's no more in Use. Are we not observing the weeks to remember those great people and their contribution to the country even after their death?


    People already know the greatness of Sanskrit especially when they undergo cermonies like marriage, death, house inauguration and so on. There is definitely some hidden agenda behind such sudden mega activity. It appears strange why some are unhappy with characterization of language as 'dead'. 'Dead' does not mea that this is not rich in literature or some areas of knowledge. Similarly, there are some other dead languages like Latin, Hebrew, Greek. This is despite the fact that Latin language contains origin of modern law.[/quote

    That there is a hidden agenda behind the observation of Sanskrit week is a baseless allegation. A great language has been remembered. Nothing more and nothing less.

  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!


    Not only Sanskrit but some othr languages like Greek, Latin and Hebrew are also dead. A language no more use is called dead language. This means no insult. Nobody says that an ancient language nomore living is not taught. But this is more relevant to scholars and not general public. For whom is Sanskrit week intended? If this is for scholars, Indian astrologers, purohits, pandas- well. .


    The purpose of observing Sanskrit week is to remind the people about the greatness of an ancient language around which the whole Indian culture revolved, even though it's no more in Use. Are we not observing the weeks to remember those great people and their contribution to the country even after their death?


    People already know the greatness of Sanskrit especially when they undergo cermonies like marriage, death, house inauguration and so on. There is definitely some hidden agenda behind such sudden mega activity. It appears strange why some are unhappy with characterization of language as 'dead'. 'Dead' does not mea that this is not rich in literature or some areas of knowledge. Similarly, there are some other dead languages like Latin, Hebrew, Greek. This is despite the fact that Latin language contains origin of modern law.[/quote

    That there is a hidden agenda behind the observation of Sanskrit week is a baseless allegation. A great language has been remembered. Nothing more and nothing less.


    Hidden agenda. Now Sanskrit, then astrology, then blak magic. This is sequence of agenda. Just see the track record of Murli Manohar Joshi, HRD minister in first NDA government. Hidden agenda gets clearer. As regards remembering old traditions, Jay Lalitha has well adviused to observe cultural week based on ancient traditions in regions. In Tamilnadu, Tamil is very significant. similarly, Maithili in Bihar. This could also be occasion to revive old forms of music, dance, craftsmanship etc.

    G. K. Ajmani Tax consultant
    http://gkajmani-mystraythoughts.blogspot.com/


  • Re: Observing Sanskrit week

    by » 6 years ago


    One more case of disgusting lack of empathy towards our own culture! While learned scholars all across the world are making it a point of throwing themselves heart-and-soul into the study of Sanskrit, considered the most beautiful of all languages, Our own people are declaring it dead and useless! Who says Sanskrit is dead? It is still being studied, taught and spoken by many! Those who care less for the language may very well be dead themselves!


    Not only Sanskrit but some othr languages like Greek, Latin and Hebrew are also dead. A language no more use is called dead language. This means no insult. Nobody says that an ancient language nomore living is not taught. But this is more relevant to scholars and not general public. For whom is Sanskrit week intended? If this is for scholars, Indian astrologers, purohits, pandas- well. .


    The purpose of observing Sanskrit week is to remind the people about the greatness of an ancient language around which the whole Indian culture revolved, even though it's no more in Use. Are we not observing the weeks to remember those great people and their contribution to the country even after their death?


    People already know the greatness of Sanskrit especially when they undergo cermonies like marriage, death, house inauguration and so on. There is definitely some hidden agenda behind such sudden mega activity. It appears strange why some are unhappy with characterization of language as 'dead'. 'Dead' does not mea that this is not rich in literature or some areas of knowledge. Similarly, there are some other dead languages like Latin, Hebrew, Greek. This is despite the fact that Latin language contains origin of modern law.[/quote

    That there is a hidden agenda behind the observation of Sanskrit week is a baseless allegation. A great language has been remembered. Nothing more and nothing less.


    Hidden agenda. Now Sanskrit, then astrology, then blak magic. This is sequence of agenda. Just see the track record of Murli Manohar Joshi, HRD minister in first NDA government. Hidden agenda gets clearer. As regards remembering old traditions, Jay Lalitha has well adviused to observe cultural week based on ancient traditions in regions. In Tamilnadu, Tamil is very significant. similarly, Maithili in Bihar. This could also be occasion to revive old forms of music, dance, craftsmanship etc.


    Lets not talk about the hidden things. We are concerned with the things before us. There is a vast difference between first NDA regime and the second NDA regime. we will see when the hidden agenda sees the light.

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