The Central Advisory Board has suggested the removal of the 'No detention policy' till class 8 which was implemented earlier based on RTE or right to education for all. It is argued that the policy had lowered the standard of learning amongst the students. Is it a move in the wrong direction?  

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  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    The only advantage this particular policy has is bringing more children ( probably) into classrooms , other than that what the advisory board argues is right because it does lower the standards because the students don't need to work hard which is very essential during those formative years. I am all for scrapping the policy because it does not do any good for our education system and there are other ways of encouraging children to attend school !


    Pay no mind to those who talk behind your back, it simply means that you are two steps ahead !!!


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    I agree with you because I have seen how lightly some students take their studies, knowing perfectly well that they will be promoted to the next class no matter how bad their results are. However,  there's a flip side that If the examination marking Is strict, there will be more drop outs, more pressure leading to suicides, running away from home etc..and children do take such extreme steps. One can argue that at least we will have an educated society..whatever little they learn because no matter what you do, kids who are serious about studies will learn In any case and those not interested will atlest attend school If not study..and indirectly In remote areas It may stop child labour


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    Lopamudra wrote:

    I agree with you because I have seen how lightly some students take their studies, knowing perfectly well that they will be promoted to the next class no matter how bad their results are. However,  there's a flip side that If the examination marking Is strict, there will be more drop outs, more pressure leading to suicides, running away from home etc..and children do take such extreme steps. One can argue that at least we will have an educated society..whatever little they learn because no matter what you do, kids who are serious about studies will learn In any case and those not interested will atlest attend school If not study..and indirectly In remote areas It may stop child labour

    In the long run does it really matter to have children who have gone to school just for the fun of it ? Child labor is in fact encouraged by the parents themselves and they will give preference to monetary gains rather than send the child to school. I am sure there are a few advantages but the disadvantages outnumber them easily. I have seen in my own school how everybody , the students and teachers are taking it easy , because they have no exam worries.As a result when the child goes to 9th standard he or she is not able to cope with the sudden pressure. Then starts the cycle of tuition and extra coaching ..


    Pay no mind to those who talk behind your back, it simply means that you are two steps ahead !!!


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    Exams are a must to the students. Exams are the yard sticks to ascertain the the student's worth to enter into higher studies. A detention less education system will make Fools. And these Fools' last resort will be Politics. Result is Country will be in the hands of FOOLS.

    This policy gives all students a free pass, which is hardly good preparation for life on a globalized lane.

     


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    usha manohar wrote:
    Lopamudra wrote:

    I agree with you because I have seen how lightly some students take their studies, knowing perfectly well that they will be promoted to the next class no matter how bad their results are. However,  there's a flip side that If the examination marking Is strict, there will be more drop outs, more pressure leading to suicides, running away from home etc..and children do take such extreme steps. One can argue that at least we will have an educated society..whatever little they learn because no matter what you do, kids who are serious about studies will learn In any case and those not interested will atlest attend school If not study..and indirectly In remote areas It may stop child labour

    In the long run does it really matter to have children who have gone to school just for the fun of it ? Child labor is in fact encouraged by the parents themselves and they will give preference to monetary gains rather than send the child to school. I am sure there are a few advantages but the disadvantages outnumber them easily. I have seen in my own school how everybody , the students and teachers are taking it easy , because they have no exam worries.As a result when the child goes to 9th standard he or she is not able to cope with the sudden pressure. Then starts the cycle of tuition and extra coaching ..

    Those children who are interested in studies on their own will study in any case. The education system has been simplified to a great extent with activities, the cumulative assessment with marks being given for every aspect be it class work, home work, class response, writing abilities, language skills and so on. The idea is to bring out best without creating the fear of exams. Teachers of course are overworked in the process but most of the time they do give in their best. It was done with a good intention of imparting quality education and motivating the weaker ones. Another aim of trying to get children to go to school was to identify their hidden talent since every child it good at something be it art, craft, music or whatever. This would help the children especially the underprivileged ones to make a living for themselves. Child labour is encouraged by the parents mostly for money, true..but in many cases when parents see some kind of potential in their kids they start sending them to school. Now, if they start failing because of their academic weakness, parents may simply say"its better to stay at home and lend a helping hand rather than go to school and fail'. But yes, I do agree that a section of students are beyond any kind of motivation and in spite of the assessment system being so simple are unable to give in their best. Would have been good if some kind of balance could have been worked out..like retest till you clear it or reduce the pass mark.


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    If the idea is to bring out best without creating the fear of exams. avoiding detention will act as counter productive. Avoiding detention creates a care free attitude in the student. Complacency  takes place. Complacency is the root of all failures in any field, be it in sports or in education.


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    This policy primarily seeks to achieve the goal of of fighting the problem of early drop-out among students,especially ones hailing from submerged sections. Now the question emanates is how far it succeeds in this direction. Any system predicated upon this narrow proposition overlooking the quality aspect which calls for a rational,objective and scientific evaluation is doomed to fail. Prof. Amartya Seen has already voiced his grave concerns over the state of primary education in the country.By pursuing this policy one can ensure retention but ultimately that can not prevent students dropping out on their own.Our class-room teaching is yet to graduate to a stage where the specific needs of bright,average and laggards.

  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    This policy primarily seeks to achieve the goal of of fighting the problem of early drop-out among students,especially ones hailing from submerged sections. Now the question emanates is how far it succeeds in this direction. Any system predicated upon this narrow proposition overlooking the quality aspect which calls for a rational,objective and scientific evaluation is doomed to fail. Prof. Amartya Seen has already voiced his grave concerns over the state of primary education in the country.By pursuing this policy one can ensure retention but ultimately that can not prevent students dropping out on their own.Our class-room teaching is yet to graduate to a stage where the specific needs of bright,average and laggards.

    Thank you said by: Shampa Sadhya

  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    Lopamudra wrote:
    usha manohar wrote:
    Lopamudra wrote:

    I agree with you because I have seen how lightly some students take their studies, knowing perfectly well that they will be promoted to the next class no matter how bad their results are. However,  there's a flip side that If the examination marking Is strict, there will be more drop outs, more pressure leading to suicides, running away from home etc..and children do take such extreme steps. One can argue that at least we will have an educated society..whatever little they learn because no matter what you do, kids who are serious about studies will learn In any case and those not interested will atlest attend school If not study..and indirectly In remote areas It may stop child labour

    In the long run does it really matter to have children who have gone to school just for the fun of it ? Child labor is in fact encouraged by the parents themselves and they will give preference to monetary gains rather than send the child to school. I am sure there are a few advantages but the disadvantages outnumber them easily. I have seen in my own school how everybody , the students and teachers are taking it easy , because they have no exam worries.As a result when the child goes to 9th standard he or she is not able to cope with the sudden pressure. Then starts the cycle of tuition and extra coaching ..

    Those children who are interested in studies on their own will study in any case. The education system has been simplified to a great extent with activities, the cumulative assessment with marks being given for every aspect be it class work, home work, class response, writing abilities, language skills and so on. The idea is to bring out best without creating the fear of exams. Teachers of course are overworked in the process but most of the time they do give in their best. It was done with a good intention of imparting quality education and motivating the weaker ones. Another aim of trying to get children to go to school was to identify their hidden talent since every child it good at something be it art, craft, music or whatever. This would help the children especially the underprivileged ones to make a living for themselves. Child labour is encouraged by the parents mostly for money, true..but in many cases when parents see some kind of potential in their kids they start sending them to school. Now, if they start failing because of their academic weakness, parents may simply say"its better to stay at home and lend a helping hand rather than go to school and fail'. But yes, I do agree that a section of students are beyond any kind of motivation and in spite of the assessment system being so simple are unable to give in their best. Would have been good if some kind of balance could have been worked out..like retest till you clear it or reduce the pass mark.

    Your views make a lot of sense but in India many parents from the poorer sections need to be made aware of the importance of education because they see only the immediate benefits like free mid day meal and no tension of study, so that the child can come back and do the house work without having to bother about studies too much.I have seen this attitude. In fact even the middle class mothers are happy that they don't have to worry about teaching their children and so on...

    I totally agree with your views about bringing out hidden talents of a child if any...But do we have a system that does it? we certainly don't.I remember when I was a child we would have drawing, sewing,gardening, music and debate and arts as part of the curriculum , and students could choose whatever interested them.Now we have no provision even for a proper library hour or sports which is played after school hours.


    Pay no mind to those who talk behind your back, it simply means that you are two steps ahead !!!


  • Re: Should the 'No detention policy' be scrapped?

    by » 4 years ago


    learning is always tedious and needs concentration, hard work and also sacrifice to a certain extent and this needs overall discipline. educational standard may be not of the highest quality. but that should not be the reason for our children just to go free with automatic get through not testing their standard,

     


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